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The Outsiders Critical Essays

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❶The reader can feel the hatred of the socs to the greaser in this dialogue when they tell him what they are going to do to him. A good example for it was that Ponyboy thought the big difference between socs and greasers was that the greasers loved Elvis and the socs loved the Beatles.

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by S.E. Hinton
S.E. Hinton
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The reader can find this kind of descriptions almost everywhere in the story, but especially in the beginning. I think the author put them there because the reader does not know the characters, and he needs to get familiar with them. The descriptions make the reader know the characters better and understand their actions. A good example of an action that was taken and suggested something about a character is the way Dally was killed. He wanted the police to kill him, so he robbed a store, and the police officers shoot him.

This shows that Dally was sensitive to a death of a friend although he acted like a tough guy. The dialogues in the stories show the thoughts and the feelings of the speakers. The way the gang members talk shows that they are gang members and street boys, because they speak in street slang. When the socs talk to greasers, the reader can feel their aversion to them. Following are some examples for dialogues that indicate something about the characters. Here is an example for a dialogue with slang in it: The highlighted words and phrases are ones that will not be used in formal writing and they even contain grammar mistakes.

Here is an example for the hate the socs have to the greasers: The reader can feel the hatred of the socs to the greaser in this dialogue when they tell him what they are going to do to him. The central figure of the story is Ponyboy that is also the narrator. Here I would analyze his character. The physical description of Ponyboy can be found in the first page of the book, page 9: I wish they were more gray, because I hate most guys that have green eyes, but I have to be content with what I have.

My hair is longer than a lot of boys wear theirs, squared off in back and long at the front and sides, but I am a greaser and most of my neighborhood rarely bothers to get a haircut. Besides, I look better with long hair. He is a bit naive sometimes, like in page 45 when he tried to convince himself that the only difference between socs and greasers is that greasers like Elvis and do not like the Beatles and socs like the Beatles and do not like Elvis.

The supporting cast in the story is the gang and other characters. The other characters in the book do not have long descriptions, and they usually appear in small parts of the plot to help its development. To conclude I can say that the characters have contributed a lot to the coherent development of the plot.

The characters are believable and they enhance the feeling of realism in the story. Hinton I will discuss the setting. The neighborhood where the gang lives is a place that fits the plot well, and helps to understand it. A good example for a description would be the one in page 85, of the dawn: All the lower valley was covered with mist, and sometimes little pieces of it broke off and floated away in small clouds.

The sky was lighter in the east, and the horizon was a thin golden line. The clouds changed from gray to pink, and the mist was touched with gold. There was a silent moment when everything held its breath, and then the sun rose. The story happens in the s in the US, it lasts a few days. The author usually describes every part of the day using Ponyboy. The mood the setting creates is of the neighborhood, and street life. This really contributes to the judicious plot development-it makes it more believable and reasonable.

To conclude I can say that the setting fits the plot and the characters in a very good way. This is the best setting that can be for this kind of plot and characters, because other setting would make the story ridiculous because a street gang can only fit into the streets.

Hinton, her style of writing would be discussed. The word usage in the dialogues between the gang members is of street slang. In the descriptions there are less simple words and more descriptive and artistic words look at Setting and Character Development for examples. There is suspense in the book-usually in the middle of chapters-that makes the reader to want to read what will happen next.

An example for suspense is when the socs have tried to drown Ponyboy-there was uncertainty and I was anxious about what is going to happen next. The way the plot develops is easy to follow and to understand-the writer does not make it too complex. Reading the book is enjoyable and there is no need to look up words in the dictionary. The book really focuses on what some kids in the US have to go through. One problem is how Ponyboy has to grow up without parents.

Another problem is that the characters are in a gang and at war with another gang. A problem with the family that was shown in the story is that kids today may have parents that are alive, but they might not have enough time for them. This happens when Johnny gets hurt and he did not want to see his parents. Also, it was a problem for Ponyboy because he was worrying about him the whole time. It really does show how these things can affect a family and friends.

Parents, educators, and critics of realism worried that they could encourage bad behavior in their readers. Hinton explores many themes over the course of the novel, such as bridging the gap between rich and poor, honor among the lawless, and the retention of innocence. When she says yes, he tells her that he can see it on the East Side, too.

When Ponyboy first meets Cherry, he thinks of her as just another Soc, wondering how a cheerleader who drives a Corvette could possibly have problems.

The Greasers are honorable, even though society at large might not see them that way. They stick up for one another and will stand together to defeat enemies or authority figures. Dally takes the blame for a crime he did not commit instead of turning in his friend, Two-Bit. Johnny kills Bob in order to save Ponyboy. Ponyboy and Johnny go into a burning building to save children in peril. Dally goes in to save them. Their devotion and loyalty to one another is admirable.

Perhaps the most important of the themes Hinton explores is that of the retention of innocence. Johnny hopes that if Ponyboy passes this lesson on to Dally, it might help Dally recapture some of his lost innocence, too. The message comes too late for Dally, but it is not too late for readers. Despite its critics, The Outsiders became a commercial success and won numerous awards.


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- The Outsiders ‘The Outsiders’ is written by S.E. Hinton. It is set in the s in a town in the USA. It is about the conflict of the two main teenager gangs called the Socs (short for Socials) and the Greasers.

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S. E. Hinton broke new ground in young adult fiction with the publication of The Outsiders. The novel’s gritty, realist portrayal of teenage life was striking, as was the fact that it .

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Unlike most editing & proofreading services, we edit for everything: grammar, spelling, punctuation, idea flow, sentence structure, & more. Get started now! Essay on The Outsiders Words | 4 Pages. The Outsiders The title of the story is The Outsiders. S.E. Hinton wrote it. Dell Publishing published the book. The main characters include Ponyboy, Darry, Soadapop, Dally Winston, Johnny, Cherry, Two-Bit, and Marcia.

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"The Outsiders" is about a gang that lives in a city in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Ponyboy Curtis, a year-old greaser, tells the story. Other characters include Sodapop and Darry (Ponyboy's brothers), Johnny, Dallas, and Two- Bit, that were also gang members and Ponyboy's friends. The Outsiders study guide contains a biography of author S. E. Hinton, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.